Treatment of endocrine disorders in dogs and horses using the Regumed Bicom optima device

Dr. Christina Eul-Matern
My name is Christina Eul-Matern. I am a veterinary surgeon and run a naturopathy practice with three key areas of treatment - acupuncture, osteopathy and bioresonance therapy. Since these areas work well together and complement each other, we tend to use conventional medical procedures infrequently.
Today, I would like to present details of the approach we took to integrating bioresonance successfully in an existing practice and show you how we use this approach to manage particularly complex cases.

Method
When patients attend our practice for the first time, their initial point of contact is a veterinary surgeon trained in Chinese medicine, osteopathy and bioresonance.
Through conversation with owners and case observations, we get an accurate history of the origin, socialisation, lifestyle, diet, work, interests, activity and resting habits of our patients as well as their vaccination and worming records. We then enquire about previous diseases, sensit...

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Borrelia – in dogs, cats, horses, and ferret too

Dr. med. vet. Solveigh von Jordans, Paderborn, Germany
I have now been running my own practice for 22 years.
Inspired by our good farm vet, Dr. Herbert Kampik, a former East Prussian ho, early on, was already an excellent homeopath, I have worked right from the start with alternative, as well as conventional, medicine. Methods of alternative medicine that I have been using are:

• Homeopathy
• Naturopathy
• Bach flower remedies
• Magnetic field and laser therapy
• UV light treatment.
Unfortunately I only came across bioresonance therapy at a very late stage
about four and a half years ago and have been using it increasingly often since then. What I particularly appreciate is the possibility of making a rapid diagnosis and of subsequently treating the patient quickly so that valuable time is not lost.
The issue of Borrelia infection has also been gaining in significance amongst our four-legged friends too in recent years. According to the latest findings, it is assumed that, ...

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The crux with the cruciate ligament with dogs

Dr. med. vet. Karen Eigenbrod, Berlin, Germany
A somewhat different conservative treatment method - an alternative approach

General information
In all cases we first have to establish the extent to which the damaged structures can still function, if at all. Serious thought
must be given to repairing the joint, taking the animal's overall well being into account.
In most cases, rupture of the canine cruciate ligaments is not a sudden traumatic insult. It is rather a case of numerous tears in the structure of the connective tissue (tendons), i.e. fatigue tears that eventually snap in half, affecting the menisci and muscles to varying degree.
Previous ultrastructural analysis (J. Haus, Z. Halata, H. J. Refior) classified three types of nerve endings in the knee: Ruffini corpuscles, Pacini corpuscles and free (afferent and efferent) nerve endings. The nerve endings in the anterior cruciate ligament correspond to those characteristic of articular capsules. The anterior cruciate lig...

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Treating skin disease in animals (dogs, cats, horses) effectively

J. Fiedler, Practising Vet, Baunatal
9-YEAR-OLD HALF-BREED DOG, UNCASTRATED
Case history
Long-standing disorder. Skin disease since puppyhood (from around 9th week) in the form of scabby efflorescences the size of a thumb-nail or, in places, a beer-mat, with severe itching.
The dog appeared listless, had grown thin and its coat had a strong smell.
The classic treatment route had been taken (3 vets, 2 animal hospitals) and traditional treatment had unfortunately been unsuccessful!
Diagnosis with BRT
Some fungal infestation, however primarily "Trichophytes", "chronic intestinal parasites" and an allergy to fungal infection. "Male genital acute" ampoule in 5 element test kit tested positive.
Therapy
Therapy was carried out with the combined test technique according to the rules of bioresonance. Basic therapy, elimination and releasing blocks, then treating the primary problems.
After the 2nd session: hardly any itching, after the 7th and final session: healthy skin, healthy coat...

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Idiopathic cystitis illustrated in cats and dogs (also applicable to human medicine)

Dr. med. vet. Helga Oberwittler, Veterinary Surgeon, Radolfzell, Germany

Introduction
Dear Colleagues, dear members of the Brugemann Family, dear friends of bioresonance therapy and dear delegates.
I became involved in bioresonance four years ago and last year I was invited and encouraged to present a lecture here at the International Congress. I would like to express my sincere thanks for that invitation.
First of all, let me introduce myself. I have been running a veterinary practice in the Lake Constance area since 1995 where I mainly treat dogs, cats and rabbits as well as horses, cattle, goats and sheep.
I studied Veterinary Medicine from 19801986 in GieBen and Vienna, where I also obtained my doctorate.
Even back then I was always interested in homeopathy and acupuncture and attended courses on the latter in Vienna and subsequently in Germany. I was fortunate to be offered a job as an assistant in a practice that also carried out homeopathy and acupuncture.
In 2010, at...

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Diseases of the spine in horses and dogs

Dr. med. vet. Jochen Becker, Tespe, Germany
Both in small animal practice and in equine practice we are constantly confronted with problems relating to the spine.
There cannot be many of us who are not familiar with a horse owner’s initial comment that their horse isn’t riding well or has poor flexibility? Throwing its head, a reluctance for the hind quarters to go under the body, a lack of suppleness – these are expressions which we regularly encounter in equine practice.
In conventional medicine this is usually the start of a frustrating examination process which usually ends in the administration of anti-inflammatory medication and a diagnosis of ‘lumbago’.
An X-ray may possibly be taken to assist diagnosis, but usually this returns normal results. In some cases they may show changes in the spinal column may be visible, often termed ‘kissing spine’, or in rare cases they may show new bone formations in the ventral region of the vertebrae, which are then diagnosed as spondylarthr...

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