Borrelia – in dogs, cats, horses, and ferret too

Dr. med. vet. Solveigh von Jordans, Paderborn, Germany
I have now been running my own practice for 22 years.
Inspired by our good farm vet, Dr. Herbert Kampik, a former East Prussian ho, early on, was already an excellent homeopath, I have worked right from the start with alternative, as well as conventional, medicine. Methods of alternative medicine that I have been using are:

• Homeopathy
• Naturopathy
• Bach flower remedies
• Magnetic field and laser therapy
• UV light treatment.
Unfortunately I only came across bioresonance therapy at a very late stage
about four and a half years ago and have been using it increasingly often since then. What I particularly appreciate is the possibility of making a rapid diagnosis and of subsequently treating the patient quickly so that valuable time is not lost.
The issue of Borrelia infection has also been gaining in significance amongst our four-legged friends too in recent years. According to the latest findings, it is assumed that, on average,...

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Treatment of infectious diseases in veterinary medicine 

Stephanie Dziallas, Animal Naturopath, Sandstedt, Germany 
My name is Stephanie Dziallas. I am an animal naturopath from Sandstedt and have been working with the BICOM® bioresonance device for about two years. When I lost my two Spanish dogs to leishmaniasis within six weeks of one another in the summer of 2005, I refused to accept that Allopurinol and Glucantime were apparently virtually the only way of treating leishmaniasis. Anger and despair over the death of my dogs spurred me on to search for other methods of treating this disease. Following extensive research I came upon the BICOM® bioresonance device and the success I have experienced in the past in treating chronic infections speaks for itself! I have now successfully treated numerous dogs and cats which were chronically infected with parasites, viruses or bacteria.

Fundamental procedure
Before starting treatment I obtain an impression of the overall constitution of the animal and decide whether homeopathic remedies or phytot...

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Borreliosis treatment in veterinary medicine with parallels to human medicine

Dr. Wilhelm Pacher, Veterinarian, A-9821 Obervellach, Austria
INTRODUCTION
Dear colleagues,
It gives me great pleasure to share some practical experiences from my work at this 46th International BICOM Congress in Fulda in 2006.
Borreliosis, an infectious disease occurring worldwide and caused by the corkscrew-shaped bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi (after its discoverer Wilhelm Burgdorfer in Lyme, USA), represents a particular threat to animals and humans in Alpine countries. The disease is transferred to animals and humans by ticks infected with Borrelia. The pathogen lives in the tick’s intestine and is transferred through saliva. Up to 60% of ticks in Alpine valleys have Borrelia in their intestines which obviously represents a big potential threat.
The disease usually progresses through three stages, the first of which, local reddening (Erythema migrans), can easily be overlooked in animals. Subsequent symptoms such as fatigue, loss of appetite and feverish outbreaks with temperature...

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Results of treating intracellular infestation by Borrelia and other micro-organisms

Alan E. Baklayan, Naturopath, Miinchen
CURRENT SITUATION
Borrelia infection was originally regarded as an extremely rare disease caused by the spirochetes of Borrelia burgdorferi. It was thought, 30 years ago, that being bitten by a tick which was itself infected with spirochetes was the only transmis-sion route.
Professor of Biology and author of the book "Cell wall deficient forms: stealth pathogens", Lida Mattmann, was able to isolate living Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes from mosquitoes, fleas, termites, from semen, urine, blood and from cere-brospinal fluid. Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes can infest tendons, muscle cells, ligaments and even actual organs directly. In the initial stages of the disease it is not always possible to see the classic red halo around the site of the bite.
Later, the disease may even affect the heart, nervous system, joints and other organs. We now know, and for me this is a very important distinc-tion, that this infection is able to mimic a whole ran...

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